Diakonia - People change the world
Ajarata Zida in Burkina Faso works at a motorcycle assembly plant. Thanks to vocational training by Diakonia's partner ATTOUS, she is now a role model for young girls. Gender is one of Diakonia's mainstreamed areas. Photo: Philip Kawode Akangbo

Mainstreamed areas

Diakonia has three mainstreamed areas that permeate our work: A gender perspective, an environmental perspective and a conflict perspective.

5/22/2014 Publisher: Eva Åberg

Gender perspective

Women and men experience poverty differently. Ignoring these differences risks further exasperating poverty and the subordination of women. All of Diakonia's work willinclude a gender perspective, which means analyzing how the work is affected by the power relations between men and women, how the work itself affects the power relations between men and women, and how contributions to gender equality can be maximized.

Working pro-actively on anti-corruption. Diakonia has a history of acting swift and decisively in cases where corruption such as embezzlement or fraud has been discovered in our programs. Such considerations are crucial when choosing partners, and when building their capacity with regards to democratic practices, financial transparency, administrative routines, and an active involvement of both poor women and men in decision-making.

Working from a rights-based approach (including human rights and democratic core values) the aim is to develop pro-active strategies with our partners. These strategies include the active empowerment of poor women and men to be able to gain influence and to keep their organisations, politicians and local government officials accountable for their decisions and provision of public services.

Environmental perspective

Environmental problems and climate change often result from underlying structural causes. For example when people living in poverty have no choice but to use resources unsustainably in order to survive, or when rich people cause problems that most severely affect people living in poverty, we seek to change those underlying structures and strive to integrate an environmental perspective. We do this by analyzing how the work is affected by the environmental situation, and vice versa how the work itself affects the environmental situation, and how contributions to an improved environmental situation can be maximized.

Conflict perspective

Conflict sensitivity is relevant to a higher or lesser degree in all countries where Diakonia currently works. A minimum requirement is to carry out an analysis with a conflict perspective for programmes in areas where armed conflict is on-going, imminent or recently concluded. This includes analyzing how the work is affected by the conflict situation,  how the work itself affects the conflict and how contributions to peace and reconciliation can be maximized.

Working proactively with anti-corruption. Diakonia has a history of acting swiftly and decisively in cases where corruption such as embezzlement or fraud has been discovered in its programmes. Such considerations are crucial when choosing partners and building their capacity with regard to democratic practices, financial transparency, administrative routines, and active involvement of poor women and men in decision-making.

The aim is to develop proactive strategies with our partners by taking a rights-based approach (including human righs and democratic core values). These strategies include the active empoverment of poor men and women to enable them to gain influenc and to hold their organizations, politicians and local government officials accountable for their decisions and provision of public services.